Dr Nelson Chanza

Dr Nelcon ChanzaName: Dr. Nelson Chanza
Position: Senior Lecturer,
Department: Geography Department
Cell: +263772209860
Email: nchanza@gmail.com, nchanza@buse.ac.zw

Qualifications:

  • PhD Environmental Geography (Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, SA),
  • MSc Environmental Policy & Planning,
  • BSc Hons Biological Sciences (University of Zimbabwe),
  • Cert. Low Emissions Development (World Bank),
  • Cert. Urban Policy & Planning (KRIHS, South Korea)

Research Publications

  1. Documentation of the indigenous-based knowledge systems relevant in climate change impact identification,
    mitigation and adaptation in Zimbabwe.
  2. Limits to climate change adaptation in Zimbabwe.Research on the major factors underpinning successful climate change adaptation in Zimbabwe.
  3. Research on the socio-economic transformation of the hidden urbanites in post-apartheid South Africa: a case of Mdantsane, East London. Project sponsored by the South African Cities Network (SACN)

Working on mostly self-funded projects.

Major Research Highlights

  1. Siyongwana, PQ. & Chanza, N. (2016) Interrogating the post-apartheid socio-economic transformation in Mdantsane, Buffalo City. GeoJournal 04/2016; DOI:10.1007/s10708-016-9714-2
  2. Chanza, N. & de Wit, A. (2016) Enhancing Climate Governance through Indigenous Knowledge: Case in Sustainability Science. South African Journal of Science, 112 (3/4), Art. #2014-0286, 7 pages. http://dx.doi.org/10.17159/sajs.2016/20140286
  3. Chanza, N. & de Wit, A. (2015) Rediscovering Indigenous Climate Knowledge for better Responses to Climate Change: Insights from Muzarabani. Int. J. Climate Change: Impacts & Responses, 6(3/4): 19-35.
  4. Chanza, N. (2015). “Indigenous-Based Adaptation: An Imperative for Sustainable Climate Change Strategies for Africa.” In: Mawere, M. & Awuah-Nyamekye, S. (eds), Harnessing cultural capital for sustainability: A pan Africanist perspective. Langaa Publishing House: Bamenda, pp. 85-134.
  5. Chingarande-Mutanga SD, Chanza N & Mugano, G (2015) Zimbabwe Youth Development Report 2015. The Zimbabwe Youth Council, Harare. ISBN: 978-0-7974-66-340
  6. Chanza, N.; Chirisa, I; Zhakata, W & Makura, ESMS (2015). The Consideration of Ethics and Justice Issues in the Formulation of Climate Change Policies in Zimbabwe. National Climate Justice Project, Available on: http://blogs.law.widener.edu/ncj/category/zimbabwe/#sthash.NyIJ7sfR.dpbs
  7. Chanza, N. & Ayal DY. (2014) Local knowledge contributes to adaptation success. Joto Afrika, ALIN, Adapting to Climate Change in Africa, Issue 15, December 2014.

Journal Articles:

  1. Chanza, N., Mugano, G., Chirisa, I & Bandauko, E. (2016). Locating Harare in the Zimbabwean Mantra of Economic Underperformance: Trends, Reality and Implications in Service Delivery. Journal of Social Development in Africa, 29 (2): 161-186.
  2. Siyongwana, PQ. & Chanza, N. (2016). Interrogating the post-apartheid socio-economic transformation in Mdantsane, Buffalo City. GeoJournal 04/2016; DOI:10.1007/s10708-016-9714-2
  3. Chanza, N. & de Wit, A. (2016). Enhancing Climate Governance through Indigenous Knowledge: Case in Sustainability Science. South African Journal of Science, 112 (3/4), Art. #2014-0286, 7 pages. http://dx.doi.org/10.17159/sajs.2016/20140286
  4. Chanza, N. & de Wit, A. (2015). Rediscovering Indigenous Climate Knowledge for better Responses to Climate Change: Insights from Muzarabani. Int. J. Climate Change: Impacts & Responses, 6(3/4): 19-35.
  5. Chanza, N.; Chirisa, I; Zhakata, W & Makura, ESMS (2015). Ethical and Justice Reflections in Zimbabwe’s INDC and Climate Policies. Brown, D.A & Taylor, P. (eds.) Lessons Learned from Research on How 23 Nations Actually Considered or Ignored Ethics and Justice in Formulating National Climate Commitments, Online: http://ethicsandclimate.org/category/indcs/
  6. Chanza, N. & Ayal DY. (2014). Local knowledge contributes to adaptation success. Joto Afrika, ALIN, Adapting to Climate Change in Africa, Issue 15, December 2014.
  7. Chanza, N. & de Wit, A. (2013). Epistemological and methodological framework for indigenous knowledge in climate science. Indilinga: African Journal of Indigenous Knowledge Systems, 12 (2): 203-206.
  8. Chanza, N. & Chirisa, I. (2011). People or Environmental Quality? Solid Waste Management Dilemma in Epworth, Harare. Regional Development Studies, United Nations Centre for Regional Development, 15: 042 – 057.
  9. Chanza, N. (2011). Building Social Capital for Sustainable Rural Development in Zimbabwe: Lessons from Korea’s Saemaul Undong. Planning and Policy Report, 2: 85-101.
  10. Chirisa, I. & Chanza, N. (2009). How will Climate Change transform African local governance? Assessing the role of civic engagement. Journal of Public Administration and Policy Research, 1 (2): 035-046.

Books & Book Chapters:

  1. Marais, L.; Ntema, L.; Rani, X.; Lenka, M.; Cloete J.; Siyongwana, P.Q.; Chanza, N.; Massey, R. & van Rooyen, D. (2016). Hidden Urbanites: South Africa’s displaced settlements 30 years after the abolition of Influx Control. South African Cities Network (SACN)/University of Free State (UFS), ISBN 978-0-620-69819-1.
  2. Chanza, N. (2015). “Indigenous-Based Adaptation: An Imperative for Sustainable Climate Change Strategies for Africa.” In: Mawere, M. & Awuah-Nyamekye, S. (eds), Harnessing cultural capital for sustainability: A pan Africanist perspective. Langaa Publishing House: Bamenda, pp. 85-134.
  3. Chingarande-Mutanga SD, Chanza, N. & Mugano, G. (2015). Zimbabwe Youth Development Report 2015. The Zimbabwe Youth Council, Harare. ISBN: 978-0-7974-66-340
  4. Chirisa, I.; Mutsindikwa, N. T.; Chanza, N.; Dumba, S.; Chaonwa-Gaza, M.; & Bowora, J (2012) Technocracy, Rationality and Post-Coloniality in Zimbabwe: A survey of selected planning issues In: Chirisa, I. (eds), Contemporary Rural and Urban Issues in Zimbabwe: Implications for Policy and Planning. Academic Press, LLC. ISBN 10: 193632055X

Extension services

1. Board Member of the Environmental Management Agency (EMA)
2. Co-author of the Zimbabwe National Climate Policy
3. Co-author of the Zimbabwe Youth Development Report